Title

Theory and fiction: Rorty's view of philosophy as literature

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2011

Abstract

Richard Rorty was one of the most committed and respected critics of the distinction between philosophy and literature. He urged philosophers to adapt an ironist stance, characterized by a double commitment to historicism and nominalism, thereby simultaneously abandoning their inveterate representationalism as well as their predilection for hypostasizing abstract concepts. The ensuing return to the individual and contingent was also supposed to facilitate the absorption of philosophy into the realm of literature proper. This brief essay focuses on some aspects of the relationship between philosophy, literature, and history, highlighting thereby the role that theorizing of an abstract kind plays in the construction of fictional worlds-marking out a territory within the crafting of literature itself that draws on the non-nominalist mode of discourse usually favored by philosophers. © 2011 International Society for the Study of European Ideas.

Publication Name

European Legacy

Volume Number

16

First Page

13

Last Page

26

Issue Number

1

DOI

10.1080/10848770.2010.517261

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