Title

What drives the conversion of native rangeland to buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) pasture in Mexico's Sonoran Desert?: The social dimensions of a biological invasion

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-4-2010

Abstract

The introduction of invasive exotic plants has many social dimensions. Although a diverse literature identifies some of the social drivers of exotic plant introduction and subsequent invasion, relatively little attention has been given to the motives of individuals involved. This research focuses on the extensive conversion of native rangeland to exotic buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) pasture by ranchers in Mexico's Sonoran Desert using data gathered through systematic interviews and ordinary least squares regression modeling to demonstrate how a few social variables determine the extent of buffelgrass introductions. Results show that land allocation to pasture is determined chiefly by ranch size, with significant roles also played by rotational grazing, buffelgrass seed harvest, and exposure to government research. Results are contextualized and explored in depth, illustrating how the extent of rangeland-to-pasture conversion in this part of the Sonoran Desert is determined by direct and indirect social factors. The study also highlights implications for buffelgrass invasion. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Publication Name

Human Ecology

Volume Number

38

First Page

495

Last Page

505

Issue Number

4

DOI

10.1007/s10745-010-9331-5

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS