Title

TEaching Measurement Through Historical Sources

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2010

Abstract

This article provides an example of the use of historical issues associated with intelligence testing to teach about the nature of measurement in psychology and includes pedagogical questions for the classroom. Students learning about research may assume that the ways psychologists measure constructs are permanent and immutable. However, using intelligence as the focus, this article shows how its measurement evolved, reflecting contemporaneous theories and assumptions. The initial sensory and psychophysical measurements designed by Cattell (1890) to measure mental ability were logically defensible in his era and gained temporary acceptance by many psychologists. Currently, standardized tests reflect the biases of later psychologists. The article highlights reasons for such changes. © 2010 American Psychological Association.

Publication Name

History of Psychology

Volume Number

13

First Page

89

Last Page

94

Issue Number

1

DOI

10.1037/a0018561

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