Title

Asian and Pacific Islander American men's help-seeking: Cultural values and beliefs, gender roles, and racial stereotypes

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2008

Abstract

Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) individuals comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the United States; however, little is know about their health status, and even less is known about the health status and help-seeking patterns of these men. This article provides an overview of APIA men's helpseeking behavior, using an ecological-contextual framework to understand the impact of cultural values and beliefs, gender roles, and racial stereotypes on helpseeking. We consider the influence on their lives of Asian philosophical and religious thought; cultural values of harmony, interdependence, and saving face; alternative views of health based on holism, fatalism, and spiritism; and the impact of racism and the model minority stereotype. Generalizations about cultures and peoples in this group of men are balanced by an emphasis on within-group differences such as ethnic background and acculturation.Implications for culturally responsive services and service providers are discussed. © 2008 by the Men's Studies Press, LLC.

Publication Name

International Journal of Men's Health

Volume Number

7

First Page

121

Last Page

136

Issue Number

2

DOI

10.3149/jmh.0702.121

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS