Title

Care Coordination Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs: Are We Family-Centered Yet?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2007

Abstract

Children with special needs require care coordination to optimize their health and well-being. This study evaluated the quality of care coordination provided for children with developmental disabilities. Mailed survey of families whose children received care at a tertiary specialty center. The surveys of 83 families were analyzed. Most families had no problem accessing acute care or therapy services (e.g., physical or occupational therapy), especially with the help of their medical providers; however, 46% reported some difficulty getting medical equipment. Respondents rated communication between medical personnel and schools the lowest-50% said that medical personnel never or rarely communicate with schools; 27% indicated that medical personnel never or rarely involved families in decision-making. Families ranked access to acute care number one; being involved in decision-making was second while communication among professionals was third. Families who reported better communication with and among their medical providers had better access to services like medical equipment. Care coordination systems that address issues of communication and information can increase access to services that will optimize health and can maximize satisfaction with care. © 2007 American Psychological Association.

Publication Name

Families, Systems and Health

Volume Number

25

First Page

293

Last Page

306

Issue Number

3

DOI

10.1037/1091-7527.25.3.293

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