Title

'The ego ideal of the good camper' and the nature of summer camp

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2006

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century the organized summer camp movement developed as a response to anxieties about the effects of the urban-industrial age on children. Camping advocates wanted to create a countermodern alternative to the world their campers inhabited most of the year. These advocates subscribed to a set of values and assumptions about what is "natural" for children that eventually provoked a debate over the uses of nature in socializing children. Environmental historians can learn much from this debate as they try to make sense of how nature has been constructed both literally and symbolically in the twentieth century.

Publication Name

Environmental History

Volume Number

11

First Page

70

Last Page

101

Issue Number

1

DOI

10.1093/envhis/11.1.70

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