Title

The value of experiential learning in long-term care education: Emphasis on simulated sensory deprivation in an institutional setting

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-1975

Abstract

Experiential learning has proved a useful tool in adding meaning to an undergraduate course in the problems of aging and delivery of long-term care. Sensory deprivation and institutionalization commonly experienced by the elderly can be simulated with proper supervision to provide the future health administrator and related health professional the opportunity to recognize the effect the combination of these two factors have on environmental perception, interpretation, and behavior. Four and a half hours of a 15-hour introductory gerontological course were divided into an overview of sensory deprivation research, a participatory session involving reduced visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli and a follow-up discussion session in both an academic and institutional setting. The response to this educational process increased the students' understanding of sensory deprivation and how the reaction to sensory loss can alter perceptions of the environment, which may in turn influence the quality of health care received. © 1975 The Gerontological Society of America.

Publication Name

Gerontologist

Volume Number

15

First Page

548

Last Page

553

Issue Number

6

DOI

10.1093/geront/15.6.548

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