Title

Apprehensive and Excited: Music Education Students’ Experience Vernacular Musicianship

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2016

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine music education students’ experiences (N = 64) in courses designed to develop vernacular musicianship and expand understandings of informal music making. Students participated in one of two classes (undergraduate/graduate), formed their own small ensembles, chose their own music and instruments, led their own rehearsals, and played without using notation. Data sources included written reflections, class observation notes, video recordings of rehearsals and performances, composition artifacts, and formal course evaluations. Participants indicated that they were comfortable working in small peer-led groups, yet they were challenged to learn without notation. Participants believed that their musicianship developed during the course, they learned new pedagogical methods, and they gained comfort working without notation in collaborative groups. Though they believed that these experiences were valuable, participants remained uncomfortable with the idea of placing students in similar settings. Graduate students appeared to be more comfortable with the experience than were undergraduate students.

Publication Name

Journal of Music Teacher Education

Volume Number

25

First Page

27

Last Page

38

Issue Number

3

DOI

10.1177/1057083714568020

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