School

School of Health Sciences and Human Performance

Department

Occupational Therapy

ICC Theme

Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation

Date

2-4-2019 2:50 PM

Abstract

Ample literature resources currently exist that support the use of canes for individuals with a variety of impairments and limitations. Studies conclude that canes and walking aids help to improve balance and walking ability in both functional activities and community mobility. There are, however, adverse consequences when it comes to the use of canes. These include decreased ability to maintain balance in certain circumstances, as well as significant strength and metabolic demands coming from their long term use (Bateni & Maki, 2005). Cane use can compromise the integrity of an individual’s upper extremity and hand over an extended period of time by decreasing dexterity and sensorimotor function (Son, Kwon, Nam, Lee, Kim & Kim, 2012). Sustained postures and repetitive movements of the same joints and muscles occur during use of adaptive equipment (Mount, Howard, Dalla Palu, Grafstrom, Pinto & Rudy, 2001). Specialty molded handles can potentially help slow the progression of negative consequences (Löfkvist, Brattström, Geborek & Lidgren, 1988). Additionally, certain styles of cane handles can be more beneficial to supporting the maintenance of the integrity of the upper extremity and hand over time compared to others (Chiou-Tan, Magee & Krouskop, 1999).

Among the few studies that have been conducted regarding the consequences of cane use on upper extremity function, a variety of methodologies have been used. Some studies have used floor reaction force gauges to analyze operating point and load amount when using canes (Taniguchi & Takanishi, 2015). Others have used surface EMG electrodes to monitor voltage output of muscles during cane usage (Chiou-Tan, Magee & Krouskop, 1999). Few others used digital potentiometers, tracking tasks, and the nine-hole pegboard test (Son, Kwon, Nam, Lee, Kim & Kim, 2012).

Though the topic of detrimental effects of cane use on the upper extremity and hand function has been lightly noted, there is a clear gap in the literature about how it can affect the upper extremity. It can also be argued that there are simply not enough studies about this issue in general, while those that do exist are limited in sample size and scope. Further research on the impacts of cane use is necessary in order to identify solutions and adjustments to canes and cane use in a way that promotes the highest form of function possible for users, with the least negative physical impact.

Based on the information gathered from a literature review, the developing research question is, “To what extent does cane handling technique impact muscle activation in wrist flexors and extensors?” Next steps in the research process include devising a methodology consisting of participant criterion, methods for gaining data, materials needed, and the exact procedures being conducted in the study.

Document Type

Poster

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Apr 2nd, 2:50 PM

How Does Cane Handling Technique Impact Upper Extremity Function?: A Literature Review

Ample literature resources currently exist that support the use of canes for individuals with a variety of impairments and limitations. Studies conclude that canes and walking aids help to improve balance and walking ability in both functional activities and community mobility. There are, however, adverse consequences when it comes to the use of canes. These include decreased ability to maintain balance in certain circumstances, as well as significant strength and metabolic demands coming from their long term use (Bateni & Maki, 2005). Cane use can compromise the integrity of an individual’s upper extremity and hand over an extended period of time by decreasing dexterity and sensorimotor function (Son, Kwon, Nam, Lee, Kim & Kim, 2012). Sustained postures and repetitive movements of the same joints and muscles occur during use of adaptive equipment (Mount, Howard, Dalla Palu, Grafstrom, Pinto & Rudy, 2001). Specialty molded handles can potentially help slow the progression of negative consequences (Löfkvist, Brattström, Geborek & Lidgren, 1988). Additionally, certain styles of cane handles can be more beneficial to supporting the maintenance of the integrity of the upper extremity and hand over time compared to others (Chiou-Tan, Magee & Krouskop, 1999).

Among the few studies that have been conducted regarding the consequences of cane use on upper extremity function, a variety of methodologies have been used. Some studies have used floor reaction force gauges to analyze operating point and load amount when using canes (Taniguchi & Takanishi, 2015). Others have used surface EMG electrodes to monitor voltage output of muscles during cane usage (Chiou-Tan, Magee & Krouskop, 1999). Few others used digital potentiometers, tracking tasks, and the nine-hole pegboard test (Son, Kwon, Nam, Lee, Kim & Kim, 2012).

Though the topic of detrimental effects of cane use on the upper extremity and hand function has been lightly noted, there is a clear gap in the literature about how it can affect the upper extremity. It can also be argued that there are simply not enough studies about this issue in general, while those that do exist are limited in sample size and scope. Further research on the impacts of cane use is necessary in order to identify solutions and adjustments to canes and cane use in a way that promotes the highest form of function possible for users, with the least negative physical impact.

Based on the information gathered from a literature review, the developing research question is, “To what extent does cane handling technique impact muscle activation in wrist flexors and extensors?” Next steps in the research process include devising a methodology consisting of participant criterion, methods for gaining data, materials needed, and the exact procedures being conducted in the study.

 

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